Sunday mid-morning in UP

There are more wishes than stars. 

It’s that thing when you’re with someone, and you love them and they know it, and they love you and you know it…but it’s a party…and you’re both talking to other people, and you’re laughing and shining…and you look across the room and catch each other’s eyes… but - but not because you’re possessive, or it’s precisely sexual… but because… that is your person in this life. And it’s funny and sad, but just because this life will end, and it’s this secret world that exists right there in public, unnoticed, that no one else knows about. It’s sort of like how they say that other dimensions exist all around us, but we don’t have the ability to perceive them. That’s - that’s what I want out of a relationship. Or just life, I guess. 

Frances Ha (2013)

Cynicism Illustrated - Eduardo Salles

(Source: chztn, via birdhands)

What we live for! 

What we live for! 

upfactbytes:


679 students of UP Diliman were surveyed from December 9-16, 2010 for UP CommResSoc’s “Kabaka Ka Pa Ba?” study, and based on the results; they had average voluntary involvement in information-seeking activities regarding civic issues. This is to say that despite having curiosity about current issues, they seldom engage in activities that sought to understand matters in-depth.
Methodology
The organization used a quantitative-qualitative approach. Multi-stage sampling was employed for the quantitative part wherein a self-administered survey questionnaire was designed and distributed to 12 randomly selected colleges in UPD. The four most populous colleges were automatically included (CSSP, ENG’G, CAL, and CS) in the sample. The researchers opted to equally distribute the survey forms across year levels by convenience. Out of the 800 survey forms distributed, 679 were returned. For the qualitative part, focus interviews were facilitated in order to delve more on UP students’ motivations behind engagement or disengagement in social and political activities within and/or outside the university. Sixteen (16) informants coming from different social and political orientations (with levels of political engagements ranging from high to low) were interviewed from different colleges in the university.
The researchers divided UP students’ engagement in different activities into three levels depending on how much effort was spent on certain activities. Activities on Level 1 involve information-seeking activities such as reading the Philippine Collegian, keeping track of issues respondents are already aware of, attending with family, friends, or classmates.
In this study, the researchers used the term social and political activities throughout the study in referring to levels 1, 2, and 3 activities. Respondents were asked to rate from 1 to 5 how often then engage in social and political activities stated in the questionnaire.
Data obtained from the survey questionnaires of 679 sampled respondents were encoded and analyzed using descriptive and crosstabs statistics through Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) Program. Meanwhile, data from the focus interviews were used to support some findings from the quantitative part.

upfactbytes:

679 students of UP Diliman were surveyed from December 9-16, 2010 for UP CommResSoc’s “Kabaka Ka Pa Ba?” study, and based on the results; they had average voluntary involvement in information-seeking activities regarding civic issues. This is to say that despite having curiosity about current issues, they seldom engage in activities that sought to understand matters in-depth.

Methodology

The organization used a quantitative-qualitative approach. Multi-stage sampling was employed for the quantitative part wherein a self-administered survey questionnaire was designed and distributed to 12 randomly selected colleges in UPD. The four most populous colleges were automatically included (CSSP, ENG’G, CAL, and CS) in the sample. The researchers opted to equally distribute the survey forms across year levels by convenience. Out of the 800 survey forms distributed, 679 were returned. For the qualitative part, focus interviews were facilitated in order to delve more on UP students’ motivations behind engagement or disengagement in social and political activities within and/or outside the university. Sixteen (16) informants coming from different social and political orientations (with levels of political engagements ranging from high to low) were interviewed from different colleges in the university.

The researchers divided UP students’ engagement in different activities into three levels depending on how much effort was spent on certain activities. Activities on Level 1 involve information-seeking activities such as reading the Philippine Collegian, keeping track of issues respondents are already aware of, attending with family, friends, or classmates.

In this study, the researchers used the term social and political activities throughout the study in referring to levels 1, 2, and 3 activities. Respondents were asked to rate from 1 to 5 how often then engage in social and political activities stated in the questionnaire.

Data obtained from the survey questionnaires of 679 sampled respondents were encoded and analyzed using descriptive and crosstabs statistics through Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) Program. Meanwhile, data from the focus interviews were used to support some findings from the quantitative part.

This is a video of Joey Ayala performing his beautiful version of Lupang Hinirang again at Dakila’s Bayanihan Republic on November 30 at the QC Memorial Circle. The first time he did was in October at TedxDiliman. The giant painting you see there, by the way, is by A.G. Saño. 

A month has passed since Yolanda. What I fear most about the passage of time is the dwindling interest in helping our fellow Filipinos in Visayas towards reconstruction and recovery. We do not stop at relief efforts. No, that’s only phase one. There’s still so much to be done.

Joey Ayala’s rendition of our national anthem, controversy aside, is an apt reminder for these trying times. Sometimes, we only need to see (or in this case, hear) things that are already there in a new light so we can better appreciate them. Ang magmahal nang dahil sa ‘yo. 

Alamin paano magmahal sa bayan. Yehess! Visit DAKILA to learn how to help in the continuing effort for Yolanda survivors.

Phone photography has its merits.

Basta’t makasama ka(yo), ako’y nakauwi na. <3 

Basta’t makasama ka(yo), ako’y nakauwi na. <3 

"THURSDAY IS THE DAY OF FEAR. On Monday you’re in great shape because you’ve got the whole week. Then Tuesday, still pretty good, still at the beginning more or less. Then Wednesday, and you’re poised, and you can accomplish much if you just apply yourself vigorously and catch up. And then suddenly, you’re driving under that huge tattered banner, with that T and that H and that U and that frightening R and the appalling S - THURSDAY - and you slide down the steep slope toward the clacking shredder blades that wait on Sunday afternoon. Another whole week of your one life."

The Anthologist by Nicholson Baker